What Is To Be Done? start time and live streaming from Exhibition Laboratory

The summer Open Exhibition Class What Is To Be Done? is going one step further. Twenty artists from the University of the Arts, Academy of Fine Arts will start the exhibition process on Wednesday 17 June, 2pm-8pm at Exhibition Laboratory. You can follow them using the Open Exhibition Class live streaming.

Starting and ending time: Helsinki: 14PM-20PM.

Live streaming also here.

Read more about What Is To Be Done.

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49 thoughts on “What Is To Be Done? start time and live streaming from Exhibition Laboratory”

  1. Barbara Vanderlinden is welcoming the participants and explaining how the exhibition will work as an open collective process. The way ideas are developed will help structure the blog. Categories and groupings will emerge on the way.

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  2. The participants are talking about how this exhibition process can help develop new ways of thinking about the dynamic potential of the exhibition space. This will involve thinking about new sustainable ways artists and curators can work together today.

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  3. He has been collecting bottles for paying the painting materials. He got an amount of about 300€

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  4. Andrey Bogush is talking about a recent project of his that relates to the question of what can be done. He wanted to try to fund his own exhibition and filmed the process. He suggests posting the film on the blog. Problems with transporting art to a fair also gave him the idea of transporting his art there himself and again filming the process. He is interested in exploring the restrictions the artist often faces today.

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  5. Now listening an audio from Riikka Stewen, who makes her statement about refusal. This happens in Kilpisjärvi.

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  6. Riikka Stewen discusses how every situation is singular. For her, even acts of extreme refusal must therefore be looked at in context – there is no general, all-encompassing definition of an act of refusal. In this exhibition context she considers refusal a primarily ethical concept, which means it is even more open to questioning. She suggests that any act of refusal is in some way affirmative.

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  7. Timo Andersson, a fourth-year painting student, is talking about how the problem of the subject in painting. He mentions ambiguity and formalism, questioning the process of making art and thinking about art in today’s postmodern world. He also mentions the arbitrary aspect of making art – how works can combat each other, be replaced or displaced, and how this is a central part of his artistic thinking and process.

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  8. Mika Helin is showing the group a project he started in 2013. Previously he’d done more object-based work, but this involved using space in new ways. He mentions how it’s not always obvious if the artwork is what he assembles in an exhibition space or the documentation about the process involved in creating the art. He’s interested in taking the exhibition space outside – displacing it anonymously so that it exists outside the system. In the space only a video or stream would be shown, so that the art too would be displaced from its usual context.

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  9. Jenny Marketou is commenting on the Duchampian “waste of time” concept about making exhibitions and art system

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  10. Riikka Stewen is commenting on some collectives and questions in relation to this Duchampian idea.

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  11. Barbara Vanderlinden is talking about Marcel Duchamp’s ‘definitively unfinished’ work The Large Glass that he worked on for 8 years. She mentions how duration is something there isn’t often room for in the context of exhibition spaces.

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  12. They’re discussing frames and the fact that by sitting there being filmed and speaking into microphones the artists are themselves becoming a sort of content. The question is how this may affect the result of the discussion. Barbara Vanderlinden suggests that this act of engagement and connection could itself perhaps be seen as an act of resistance.

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  13. Paula Saraste is talking about her and Sara Kovamaki’s plan for an ‘inner performance’ that doesn’t fit into the system but that still creates connections by enabling others to participate. This, for them, is a way of exploring what can be done and how boundaries can be pushed.

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  14. They are talking about Jean-Luc Godard’s revolutionary thinking about art and the problem with binary oppositions in today’s world. The question is if manifestos are simply too formatted to be relevant today.

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  15. The speaker is talking about whether art is worthless. His plan is to make a free-form club to explore what happens when people get together and agree to become sell-outs for a day.

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  16. Henrik Heinonen is talking about the problem with using terms like radically without defining them. He points out that institutional critique has been going on since the ’60s but artists still have to go through the system.

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  17. Heinrik Heinonen is talking about the definition and origins of the word precarious and how it relates to artists. He talks about how even if artists struggle with their careers they still have social and cultural capital because of their education. In this way they’re in a bubble and maybe what is to be done could involve trying to see beyond this and change things on a local scale.

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  18. Henna Laininen is talking about the ethical debates surrounding our use of resources. She’s interested in what can be done in this area as an artist. She talks about art’s potential as a testing ground.

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  19. Henna Laininen is talking about art and learning. She refers to what happens if you refuse to do things like fly and if you refuse to get involved in competition. She wants to explore what else is possible and is interested in the idea of just walking away and seeing where she ends up.

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  20. They’re talking about the possibility of going back to old skills and ways of living and how hard it is finding anywhere you can do that now.

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  21. They’re discussing what it means to step back out of a system and the problem with the concepts of in and out in ecological terms today.

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  22. Jenny Marketou replies back on quotating Hito Steyerl about the ‘poor image’ term that herself coined. And how these images are meditating our narratives.

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  23. They’re discussing images and value – the idea that the value of an image is not in its meaning any more. The screen is in a way our reality now and this is changing narratives.

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